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CHEO Discovery Minute
 
Many kids visit emergency departments with gastroenteritis, or a stomach infection. Six Canadian pediatric emergency departments took part in the Probiotic Regimen for Outpatient Utility of Treatment or PROGUT trial. Researchers wanted to know if giving young children probiotics could reduce the duration and severity of vomiting and diarrhea associated with acute gastroenteritis. In this CHEO Discovery Minute, Emergency Physician Dr. Ken Farion shares the results of the PROGUT Trial.  
Wednesday, August 14, 2019
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Impulsive behaviour linked to sleep and screen time, CHEO study finds
A paper published today in Pediatrics suggests that children and youth who do not sleep enough and use screens more than recommended are more likely to act impulsively and make poorer decisions. The findings come from the globally recognized Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group (HALO) at the CHEO Research Institute in Ottawa.

“Impulsive behaviour is associated with numerous mental health and addiction problems, including eating disorders, behavioural addictions and substance abuse,” said Dr. Michelle Guerrero, lead author and postdoctoral fellow at the CHEO Research Institute and the University of Ottawa. “This study shows the importance of especially paying attention to sleep and recreational screen time, and reinforces the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth. When kids follow these recommendations, they are more likely to make better decisions and act less rashly than those who do not meet the guidelines.”
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Tuesday, August 6, 2019
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2 CHEO scientists awarded $7.6M in national competition
Two scientists at the CHEO Research Institute have been granted a total of $7.6 million over seven years in the last round of Foundation Grant funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).

“This is an outstanding result for CHEO and the CHEO Research Institute. It recognizes the high calibre of work our scientists are undertaking to improve care for children, youth and families,” said Dr. Jason Berman, CHEO Research Institute’s new CEO and Scientific Director, as well as CHEO’s new Vice-president of Research. “Drs. Lochmüller and Korneluk are leaders in their fields and I am delighted to see them receive the support of Canada’s scientific community through receipt of these highly competitive and prestigious awards.” Read More
Monday, July 29, 2019
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New tool developed by CHEO Researchers gives children, youth and families the information they need to recognize and treat anaphylaxis
Anaphylaxis is the most severe form of allergy that rapidly affects multiple body systems and can be deadly. In Canada, around 8% of allergy-related emergency department visits are due to anaphylactic shock. Despite the seriousness and frequency of anaphylaxis, there’s a significant gap in the recognition and treatment by children, youth and families. A research team at the CHEO Research Institute has developed a new education toolkit called Kids’ CAP that helps children, youth and families better understand how to recognize and treat an anaphylactic reaction. Read More
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